Wednesday, June 19, 2013

The Power of Pranayama Chi-Kung Life Force Energy

The movie “Star Wars” is famous for its idea of “the Force” which is described as “an energy field created by all living things that surrounds us, penetrates us, and binds the galaxy together.”  Though the Force is treated as fiction by Hollywood and most Westerners, in fact the concept has a rich history around the world.  In traditional Chinese philosophy and medicine it is called “Chi.” Japanese mystics and martial artists call it “Ki.”  Indian yogis and sadhus call it “Prana.”  The Ancient Greeks called it “Pneuma.”  Jewish Kabbalists call it “Nefish.”  Christians call it the “Holy Ghost.”  Muslims call it “Baraka.”  And the Polynesians call it “Mana.”

"Qi or chi is the source of everything, the building block of all things. Human beings are made of living cells, and when we look into each cell we see a membrane, the nucleus and so on. Then if you look further into that structure you’ll see atoms - electrons, protons, and neutrons. And if you look even further, scientists now tell us that they can see energy there. However, according to the 5,000-year-old Chinese Qigong theory, if you go beyond scientific measurement - this is called the chi level. We can communicate with the chi level using our minds to do different things, such as healing." - Luke Chan, Chi Kung Master


Tuesday, June 4, 2013

The Power of Unlimited Beliefs

Our brains are made up of tiny nerve cells called “neurons” which branch out and connect to each other forming a neural network.  At each connection point, thoughts and emotions are incubated and holographically stored by associative memory.  This means that all ideas, thoughts, feelings, and memories are interconnected and have possible relationships with one another.  For instance the concept of motherhood is stored in all our neural networks, but each person’s concept is built from their own unique amalgamation of ideas, emotions and past experiences.  Some people may have motherhood connected to unconditional love and forgiveness, so when they think about motherhood, they experience memories/feelings of happiness and acceptance.  Other people may have motherhood connected to disappointment and ridicule, so when they think about motherhood, they experience memories/feelings of rejection and depression.  We all build our own neural networks based on our own subjective experiences, how we perceive and what we believe.

"What we ultimately do is tell ourselves a story about what the outside world is.  Any information that we process, any information that we take in from the environment is always colored by the experiences that we've had and an emotional response that we're having to what we're bringing in.  Who is in the driver's seat when we control our emotions or we respond to our emotions?  We know physiologically that nerve cells that fire together, wire together.  If you practice something over and over, those nerve cells have a long-term relationship.  If you get angry on a daily basis, if you get frustrated on a daily basis, if you suffer on a daily basis, if you give reason for the victimization in your life, you're rewiring and reintegrating that neural net on a daily basis, and that neural net now has a long-term relationship with all those other nerve cells called an 'identity.'  We also know that nerve cells that don't fire together, no longer wire together.  They lose their long-term relationship because every time we interrupt the thought process that produces a chemical response in the body, every time we interrupt it, those nerve cells that are connected to each other start breaking the long-term relationship."  -Dr. Joe Dispenza, "What the Bleep Do We Know?"